Predictions of tumor morphological stability and evaluation against experimental observations

Speaker: 

Kara Pham

Institution: 

UCI

Time: 

Monday, October 18, 2010 - 5:30pm

Location: 

RH 306

The hallmark of malignant tumors is their invasion of local tissue and infiltration
of distant organs (metastasis). A defining characteristic of aggressive tumors
is an unstable morphology, including invasive fingers and protrusions. Shape
instabilities (growing protrusions) are associated with local invasiveness, also
often a precursor to tumor metastasis. We study tumor morphological stability
by employing three mathematical models to gain insight into tumor invasion
and metastasis. Using linear theory, we study the tumor morphological stability
described by each model and evaluate the consistency between theoretical
model predictions and experimental data from in vitro 3D multicellular tumor
spheroids. We will discuss the results and show that it is feasible to extract parameter
values from a limited set of data and create a self-consistent modeling
framework that can be extended to the multiscale study of cancer. Numerical
methods are used to simulate the nonlinear effects of stress on solid tumor
growth and invasiveness.

Applying to Graduate School in Mathematics Workshop

Speaker: 

Time: 

Wednesday, October 6, 2010 - 5:00pm

Location: 

RH 440R

* Workshop for Undergraduate Students on preparing for and applying to graduate school. All levels of students are encouraged to attend. The workshop will feature a presentation on what students should do in their Sophomore-Senior years to prepare for graduate studies and how to apply for graduate school. Also, there will be a panel of current UCI students to offer advice on the application process and selecting a school.

Fractals

Speaker: 

Anton Gorodetski

Institution: 

UC Irvine

Time: 

Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 5:00pm

Location: 

RH 440R

We will consider the notions of fractal and fractal dimension. Examples of
fractals in mathematics (such as Cantor set, Serpinskiy carpet, Julia and
Mandelbrot sets, fractals generated by iterated function systems) and in
real life will be discussed.

How to Count using Generating Functions

Speaker: 

Sho Seto

Institution: 

UC Irvine

Time: 

Wednesday, April 14, 2010 - 5:00pm

Location: 

RH 440R

For n = 1, 2, 3. we can give a geometric argument in proving the formula
1 + 2 + 3 + .. + n = n(n+1)/2
1^2 + 2^2 + .. n^2 = n(n+1)(2n+1)/6
1^3 + 2^3 + + n^3 = (n(n+1)/2)^2
For n >3, there is a method using generating functions to obtain that formula.
We will go over the geometric and generating function arguments.

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