What do Molecular Fluctuations Tell us about Cellular Organization

Speaker: 

Hana El-Samad

Institution: 

UC San Francisco

Time: 

Monday, May 21, 2012 - 11:00am to 12:00pm

Host: 

Location: 

1114 Nat Sci 1

Stochasticity is a hallmark of cellular processes, and different classes of genes show large differences in their cell-to-cell variability (noise). To decipher the sources and consequences of this noise, we systematically measured pairwise correlations between large numbers of genes, including those with high variability. We find that there is substantial pathway variability shared across similarly regulated genes. This induces quantitative correlations in the expression of functionally related genes such as those involved in the Msn2/4 stress response pathway, amino acid biosynthesis, and mitochondrial maintenance. Bioinformatic analyses and genetic perturbations suggest that fluctuations in PKA and Tor signaling contribute to pathway-specific variability. Our results argue that a limited number of well-delineated ‘‘noise regulons’’ operate across a yeast cell and that such coordinated fluctuations enable a stochastic but coherent induction of functionally related genes. We discuss how this principle might be general to stress responses across different organisms and the mechanisms by which stochastic but coherent stress responses strengthen resistance to environmental insults. More broadly, our work shows that pathway noise is a quantitative tool for exploring pathway features and regulatory relationships in un-stimulated systems.

Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Directed Cell Motility

Speaker: 

Herbert Levine

Institution: 

UC San Diego

Time: 

Monday, January 23, 2012 - 11:00pm

Directed cell motility is a process whereby the motility machinery of the cell (involving the interaction of actin with myosin) is organized spatially so as to cause directed motion. In Dictyostelium, this occurs as the cell responds to cAMP gradients during the aggregation process. In keratocytes, the cell spontaneously polarizes itself (without external cues). This talk will focus on spatially extended modeling of both the signaling system which encodes the directional information and the downstream mechanical response and the comparison of these models to detailed experimental studies of both of these systems.

Spatial Stochastic Simulation of Polarization in Yeast Mating

Speaker: 

Linda Petzold

Institution: 

UC Santa Barbara

Time: 

Monday, June 6, 2011 - 12:00pm

Location: 

Nat Sci 2, Room 3201

In microscopic systems formed by living cells, the small numbers of some reactant molecules can result in dynamical behavior that is discrete and stochastic rather than continuous and deterministic. Spatio-temporal gradients and patterns play an important role in many of these systems. In this lecture we report on recent progress in the development of computational methods and software for spatial stochastic simulation. Then we describe a spatial stochastic model of polarisome formation in mating yeast. The new model is built on simple mechanistic components, but is able to achieve a highly polarized phenotype with a relatively shallow input gradient, and to
track movement in the gradient. The spatial stochastic simulations are able to reproduce experimental observations to an extent that is not possible with deterministic simulation.

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